CidRunsFunny

You can ask me anything~ :3   Everything here is cats and video games. I do some pro-va work, sometimes I'll post my fan project stuff here. I'm also an animal rights activist in every sense, with every animal. Except very large wasps. I'm a vegan. I also love cartoons. I'm very opinionated, mostly about anime. And pokemon.

coolghost:

tv show. white man. hes sad. he has to do important thing but its hard. his girlfriend died probably. TWSIT!! theres another white man. maybe MORE. hes sad too but for different reason. its very deep probably. theyre best friends but not gay but maybe they are haha fandom!!! every girl dies or goes away. just not gay white man friend. 10 seasons 100 million viewers. what will moody white men do this week.

(via nuclear-taste)

— 16 minutes ago with 179619 notes
#blegh 

grumpysalmon:

nerd-mentality:

absentions:

And if you’re still up at 4 a.m.,

you are in love or lonely,

and I don’t know which one is worse.

Wow

im looking up dragon ball z trivia

(Source: absentions, via airzonk)

— 7 hours ago with 470960 notes

dateable-yosuke:

A story told in three parts. oh mikorin, bless this child

— 19 hours ago with 5224 notes
#gekkan shoujo nozaki-kun  #spoilers  #important  #good shirt 

findmeinsf:

bestvidsonline:

Rescued dogs - before and after! These people who saved them did an amazing job!

I’m crying so hard

(via american-slothic)

— 20 hours ago with 93162 notes
#dogs  #perfect  #animals  #cute animals 
necessaryveganism:

fuckfatcunts13:

give-a-fuck-about-nature:

Do not harm anyone to meet your nutritional needs. Animals can live. Animals can be set free. We can love them and care for them and that will feel so much better than killing them, or not caring as we pay others to kill them.

There is nothing wrong with killing animals. That is completely natural. Other animals kill animals all the time, and eat them. You need protein to live (yes I know there are other fucking full proteins than meat you twats, this is coming from a 6 year commercial vegetarian and somebody who’s attending college for natural health and nutritional therapy and herbology so here’s a preemptive shut the fuck up) and the best source is animal. What IS wrong is unnecessarily harming and torturing animals, pumping them full of antibiotics, etc. and making an ECONOMICAL INDUSTRY out of “FARMING” live animals (like what the actual fuck) which is why I only eat meat I hunt.
And another thing that really irritates me is when I explain something like that to a lot of people (other than the typical “well I don’t give a fuck because animals don’t have souls” or “I don’t support it (which is bullshit because buying it IS supporting it) but it’s not me doing it” bullshit) is when people say “oh my god how can you kill something they’re so cute and oh my god” when they sit there and eat meat from the store with absolutely no issue, and then when I start to say “well if you have any idea what goes on in the FUCKING MEAT FACTORIES you’d know that me shooting one in the head so that it dies instantaneously and then using all of the parts is much better than what happens to commercial meat” they have a freak out fit and say “OH MY GOD THATS SO DISGUSTING STOP TELLING ME THAT ITS GOING TO MAKE ME SICK DONT TELL ME”
Fuck you.
Rant over.
"People are afraid of the truth because it destroys their illusions."-Friedrich Nietzsche

To be honest, I don’t think I’d be fully capable of appreciating the fact that you “use all of the parts” of my body since I’ve just been, you know, shot in the head. I wouldn’t really get the chance to see just how kind of you it is to shoot me in the head instead of buying meat at the store, since you just, you know, shot me in the head. 
Please, could you not attempt to present your horrible, sadistic, uncivilised, inhuman and unnecessary acts as something noble and praise-worthy? You think we’re going to sympathize with you and condone your actions because you think animals are the “best source” of protein? That’s why you decide to go and shoot someone in the head? Because you believe they are a slightly better source of protein? Because if that’s all it takes to get you to kill, I suggest you see a psychiatrist.
No offense.


Also want to chime in: You probably have a car, money, running water, and access to a store where you can buy clothing.  You aren’t starving, or experiencing any lack in terms of your diet that will put you in any danger.  It’s not being “in tune with nature” or whatever to go out and kill animals when you have a bunch of modern day luxuries that make it obsolete.  It was natural to eat animals when food was scarce and there weren’t other options available, not when you can go to the store and pick up a thirty pound bag of rice for forty bucks.  It is ethically wrong because there’s no longer any need to.That aside, can tumblr as a culture move past responding to calm arguments with huge “FUCK YOU HAHAHA SMACK DOWN!!” rants?  They’re never definitive, they’re really rude to anyone with a viewpoint other than your own, and they make the person posting them look like a mentally unwell bratty teenager.  I understand if someone’s being racist or gross, but this is just someone talking about how they love animals and don’t want people to hurt them needlessly.

necessaryveganism:

fuckfatcunts13:

give-a-fuck-about-nature:

Do not harm anyone to meet your nutritional needs. Animals can live. Animals can be set free. We can love them and care for them and that will feel so much better than killing them, or not caring as we pay others to kill them.

There is nothing wrong with killing animals. That is completely natural. Other animals kill animals all the time, and eat them. You need protein to live (yes I know there are other fucking full proteins than meat you twats, this is coming from a 6 year commercial vegetarian and somebody who’s attending college for natural health and nutritional therapy and herbology so here’s a preemptive shut the fuck up) and the best source is animal.
What IS wrong is unnecessarily harming and torturing animals, pumping them full of antibiotics, etc. and making an ECONOMICAL INDUSTRY out of “FARMING” live animals (like what the actual fuck) which is why I only eat meat I hunt.

And another thing that really irritates me is when I explain something like that to a lot of people (other than the typical “well I don’t give a fuck because animals don’t have souls” or “I don’t support it (which is bullshit because buying it IS supporting it) but it’s not me doing it” bullshit) is when people say “oh my god how can you kill something they’re so cute and oh my god” when they sit there and eat meat from the store with absolutely no issue, and then when I start to say “well if you have any idea what goes on in the FUCKING MEAT FACTORIES you’d know that me shooting one in the head so that it dies instantaneously and then using all of the parts is much better than what happens to commercial meat” they have a freak out fit and say “OH MY GOD THATS SO DISGUSTING STOP TELLING ME THAT ITS GOING TO MAKE ME SICK DONT TELL ME”

Fuck you.

Rant over.

"People are afraid of the truth because it destroys their illusions."
-Friedrich Nietzsche

To be honest, I don’t think I’d be fully capable of appreciating the fact that you “use all of the parts” of my body since I’ve just been, you know, shot in the head. I wouldn’t really get the chance to see just how kind of you it is to shoot me in the head instead of buying meat at the store, since you just, you know, shot me in the head

Please, could you not attempt to present your horrible, sadistic, uncivilised, inhuman and unnecessary acts as something noble and praise-worthy? You think we’re going to sympathize with you and condone your actions because you think animals are the “best source” of protein? That’s why you decide to go and shoot someone in the head? Because you believe they are a slightly better source of protein? Because if that’s all it takes to get you to kill, I suggest you see a psychiatrist.

No offense.

Also want to chime in: You probably have a car, money, running water, and access to a store where you can buy clothing. You aren’t starving, or experiencing any lack in terms of your diet that will put you in any danger. It’s not being “in tune with nature” or whatever to go out and kill animals when you have a bunch of modern day luxuries that make it obsolete. It was natural to eat animals when food was scarce and there weren’t other options available, not when you can go to the store and pick up a thirty pound bag of rice for forty bucks. It is ethically wrong because there’s no longer any need to.

That aside, can tumblr as a culture move past responding to calm arguments with huge “FUCK YOU HAHAHA SMACK DOWN!!” rants? They’re never definitive, they’re really rude to anyone with a viewpoint other than your own, and they make the person posting them look like a mentally unwell bratty teenager. I understand if someone’s being racist or gross, but this is just someone talking about how they love animals and don’t want people to hurt them needlessly.

(via adviceforvegans)

— 20 hours ago with 405 notes

actuallyratchet:

dragonborn at their finest 

(via khstar126)

— 21 hours ago with 28045 notes
stem-cell:

rosalarian:

pourquoi-nutmeg:

nortonism:

The thing about this is that sculptures like these in art history were for the male gaze. Photoshop a phone to it and suddenly she’s seen as vain and conceited. That’s why I’m 100% for selfie culture because apparently men can gawk at women but when we realize how beautiful we are we’re suddenly full of ourselves…

YES.

Girls don’t let anyone tell you loving yourself is vanity.

“You painted a naked woman because you enjoyed looking at her, put a mirror in her hand and you called the painting “Vanity,” thus morally condemning the woman whose nakedness you had depicted for you own pleasure.” ― John Berger, Ways of Seeing

stem-cell:

rosalarian:

pourquoi-nutmeg:

nortonism:

The thing about this is that sculptures like these in art history were for the male gaze. Photoshop a phone to it and suddenly she’s seen as vain and conceited. That’s why I’m 100% for selfie culture because apparently men can gawk at women but when we realize how beautiful we are we’re suddenly full of ourselves…

YES.

Girls don’t let anyone tell you loving yourself is vanity.

“You painted a naked woman because you enjoyed looking at her, put a mirror in her hand and you called the painting “Vanity,” thus morally condemning the woman whose nakedness you had depicted for you own pleasure.” ― John Berger, Ways of Seeing

(Source: nevver, via khstar126)

— 21 hours ago with 175449 notes
give-a-fuck-about-nature:


By definition: Veganism /ˈviːɡənɪzəm/ is the practice of abstaining from the use of animal products, particularly in diet, as well as following an associated philosophy that rejects the commodity status of sentient animals. A follower of veganism is known as a vegan.

To understand what it means to be vegan, it is vital to reflect on the historical roots and origin of the word. Many people think of the term vegan and its associated lifestyle as something new, faddish, insurgent or radical. In many ways, just the opposite is true. The word vegan was coined in England by Donald Watson in 1944. He, along with several other members of the Vegetarian Society in Leicester, England, wanted to form an alliance of nondairy vegetarians as a subgroup of the Society. When their proposal was rejected, they ventured to start their own organization. They prospected what to call themselves, and, after evaluating a range of ingenious possibilities, agreed that “vegan” (decisively pronounced VEE-gn, with a long “e” and hard “g”) was best. It was derived from the word “vegetarian” by taking the first three letters (veg) and the last two letters (an) because, as Donald Watson explained, “veganism starts with vegetarianism and carries it through to its logical conclusion.”
In late 1944, The Vegan Society was established, followed shortly thereafter by the creation of a manifesto describing their unified mission and perspective. Although the group advocated a totally plant-based diet excluding flesh, fish, fowl, eggs, honey, and animals’ milk, butter and cheese, they also encouraged the manufacture and use of alternatives to animal commodities, including clothing, shoes and other apparel. In addition, the group acknowledged that the elimination of exploitation of any kind was necessary in order to bring about a more reasonable and humane society and emancipate both humans and animals.
In 1960, the American Vegan Society was born in the United States, founded by Jay Dinshah. It wholly embraced, and continues to embrace, the principles of its British predecessor, advocating a strictly plant-based diet and lifestyle free of animal products. In addition, the American Vegan Society promotes the philosophy of Ahimsa, a Sanskrit word interpreted as “dynamic harmlessness,” along with advocating service to humanity, nature and creation. In other words, in order to practice veganism, it is not sufficient to simply avoid specific foods and products; it is necessary to actively participate in beneficial selfless action as well.
When we understand the origin of the term and the guiding principles established by the founders of the vegan movement, we see that, although inspired by vegetarianism, vegan living encompasses far more than one’s diet. In fact, to be a full member of the American Vegan Society, one must not only be vegan in diet but must also exclude animal products from one’s clothing, cosmetics, toiletries, household goods and everyday commodities. Contrary to popular belief, people who eliminate all animal-based foods from their diet but who continue to wear non-vegan clothing or use non-vegan products are not vegan — they are total vegetarians.
Omitting animal products from one’s life is a passive action; it does not necessitate asserting oneself, it merely involves avoidance. In order to actually implement and realize Ahimsa, we must engage the “dynamic” part of “dynamic harmlessness.” Therefore, to fully apply the vegan ethic, not only are vegans compelled to do the least harm, they are obliged to do the most good.
When people choose veganism, they make an ethical commitment to bettering themselves and the world around them. This is a pledge not to be taken lightly as it requires us to seriously examine all facets of ours lives. Certainly, animal-free food, clothing and cosmetic choices are a paramount part of becoming vegan. However, when we delve more deeply into its essence, we see that a vegan outlook extends far beyond the material and tangible. Vegan perspectives permeate our relationships, spiritual beliefs, occupation and pastimes. Hence, there are few areas of life that the vegan ethic doesn’t touch or influence to one degree or other.
Becoming vegan is a process; rarely does someone convert to total veganism overnight. More typically, people transition to a vegan lifestyle, generally altering their diet first and then gradually replacing their clothing, cosmetics and incongruous habits with more serene, compassionate options. Some vegans eventually change jobs in order to align their vocation with their beliefs. Others become activists on behalf of animals, social justice, peace and/or the environment, do volunteer work, adopt children, take in homeless animals, reduce their material consumption, or any number of other positive, beneficent acts.
In truth, there is no end to the vegan journey. We are perpetually challenged to do more, to strive higher, to see and understand more clearly, to be more loving and humble. This is the gift of veganism. It is a guide for compassionate living. It is the path of honoring our roots, our planet, all Life, and ourselves.

give-a-fuck-about-nature:

By definition: Veganism /ˈvɡənɪzəm/ is the practice of abstaining from the use of animal products, particularly in diet, as well as following an associated philosophy that rejects the commodity status of sentient animals. A follower of veganism is known as a vegan.

To understand what it means to be vegan, it is vital to reflect on the historical roots and origin of the word. Many people think of the term vegan and its associated lifestyle as something new, faddish, insurgent or radical. In many ways, just the opposite is true. The word vegan was coined in England by Donald Watson in 1944. He, along with several other members of the Vegetarian Society in Leicester, England, wanted to form an alliance of nondairy vegetarians as a subgroup of the Society. When their proposal was rejected, they ventured to start their own organization. They prospected what to call themselves, and, after evaluating a range of ingenious possibilities, agreed that “vegan” (decisively pronounced VEE-gn, with a long “e” and hard “g”) was best. It was derived from the word “vegetarian” by taking the first three letters (veg) and the last two letters (an) because, as Donald Watson explained, “veganism starts with vegetarianism and carries it through to its logical conclusion.”

In late 1944, The Vegan Society was established, followed shortly thereafter by the creation of a manifesto describing their unified mission and perspective. Although the group advocated a totally plant-based diet excluding flesh, fish, fowl, eggs, honey, and animals’ milk, butter and cheese, they also encouraged the manufacture and use of alternatives to animal commodities, including clothing, shoes and other apparel. In addition, the group acknowledged that the elimination of exploitation of any kind was necessary in order to bring about a more reasonable and humane society and emancipate both humans and animals.

In 1960, the American Vegan Society was born in the United States, founded by Jay Dinshah. It wholly embraced, and continues to embrace, the principles of its British predecessor, advocating a strictly plant-based diet and lifestyle free of animal products. In addition, the American Vegan Society promotes the philosophy of Ahimsa, a Sanskrit word interpreted as “dynamic harmlessness,” along with advocating service to humanity, nature and creation. In other words, in order to practice veganism, it is not sufficient to simply avoid specific foods and products; it is necessary to actively participate in beneficial selfless action as well.

When we understand the origin of the term and the guiding principles established by the founders of the vegan movement, we see that, although inspired by vegetarianism, vegan living encompasses far more than one’s diet. In fact, to be a full member of the American Vegan Society, one must not only be vegan in diet but must also exclude animal products from one’s clothing, cosmetics, toiletries, household goods and everyday commodities. Contrary to popular belief, people who eliminate all animal-based foods from their diet but who continue to wear non-vegan clothing or use non-vegan products are not vegan — they are total vegetarians.

Omitting animal products from one’s life is a passive action; it does not necessitate asserting oneself, it merely involves avoidance. In order to actually implement and realize Ahimsa, we must engage the “dynamic” part of “dynamic harmlessness.” Therefore, to fully apply the vegan ethic, not only are vegans compelled to do the least harm, they are obliged to do the most good.

When people choose veganism, they make an ethical commitment to bettering themselves and the world around them. This is a pledge not to be taken lightly as it requires us to seriously examine all facets of ours lives. Certainly, animal-free food, clothing and cosmetic choices are a paramount part of becoming vegan. However, when we delve more deeply into its essence, we see that a vegan outlook extends far beyond the material and tangible. Vegan perspectives permeate our relationships, spiritual beliefs, occupation and pastimes. Hence, there are few areas of life that the vegan ethic doesn’t touch or influence to one degree or other.

Becoming vegan is a process; rarely does someone convert to total veganism overnight. More typically, people transition to a vegan lifestyle, generally altering their diet first and then gradually replacing their clothing, cosmetics and incongruous habits with more serene, compassionate options. Some vegans eventually change jobs in order to align their vocation with their beliefs. Others become activists on behalf of animals, social justice, peace and/or the environment, do volunteer work, adopt children, take in homeless animals, reduce their material consumption, or any number of other positive, beneficent acts.

In truth, there is no end to the vegan journey. We are perpetually challenged to do more, to strive higher, to see and understand more clearly, to be more loving and humble. This is the gift of veganism. It is a guide for compassionate living. It is the path of honoring our roots, our planet, all Life, and ourselves.

(via adviceforvegans)

— 1 day ago with 587 notes

provoltagecosplay:

Amazing photos of Rex and Raiden taken by Lionel Lum @ Otakon 2014.
Thank you so much Lionel Lum!!! ┌(★o☆)┘

(via shivi-vivi)

— 1 day ago with 67 notes
#cosplay  #dang  #metal gear solid 

sketchinetch:

cremebuns:

emeralddragoness:

cremebuns:

A man just walked past me and said “excuse me, but you look very nice tonight darlin” I said thank you and he said you’re welcome and walked off. And that is how you compliment a woman without harassing them

No, that is still unsolicited, and thus, harassment. No amount of “darlins” is gonna make me not want to punch your ass for coming on to me without provocation.

GOD

SHUT UP

UR SO STUPID

image

[x]

(Source: cremebun)

— 1 day ago with 413817 notes